Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Antiqued First Page

Around the World in 80 Days - Antiqued First Page - Jules Verne

This single page item is a reproduction of the first page of Jules Verne’s classic novel, Around the World in 80 Days. It makes for a terrific piece to frame and decorate a study or bedroom!

The page is standard 8.5" x 11" in size and has been hand antiqued via our own unique paper aging process to achieve a look you won’t find anywhere else.

The actual page contains the following text (though please note that the formatting and font will be different as viewed on this page – see photo for exact formatting and look!):

 

Around the World in 80 Days

By Jules Verne

Chapter 1

In Which Phileas Fogg and Passerpartout Accept Each Other, The One as Master, the Other As Man

Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814. He was one of the most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention; an enigmatical personage, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People saidthat he resembled Byron–at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thousand years without growing old.

Certainly an Englishman, it was more doubtful whether Phileas Fogg was a Londoner. He was never seen on ‘Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the “City”; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln’s Inn, or Gray’s Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen’s Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts. He certainly was not a manufacturer; nor was he a merchant or a gentleman farmer. His name was strange to the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan’s Association, or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of theEntomologists, founded mainly for the purpose of abolishing pernicious insects.

Phileas Fogg was a member of the Reform, and that was all.


Our antiqued paper is delicately laced with a subtle hint of gold in the creases creating an almost magical look. (Although it’s difficult to catch with a camera, you can see in the image below how the shimmering is caught in the light)


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