Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Antiqued First Page

This single page item is a reproduction of the first page of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic story, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. It makes for a terrific piece to frame and decorate a study or bedroom!

The page is standard 8.5" x 11" in size and has been hand antiqued via our own unique paper aging process to achieve a look you won’t find anywhere else.

The actual page contains the following text (though please note that the formatting and font will be different as viewed on this page – see photo for exact formatting and look!):

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

By Harriet Beecher Stowe

Chapter 1
In Which the Reader Is Introduced to a Man of Humanity

Late in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P—-, in Kentucky. There were no servants present, and the gentlemen, with chairs closely approaching, seemed to be discussing some subject with great earnestness.

For convenience sake, we have said, hitherto, two gentlemen. One of the parties, however, when critically examined, did not seem, strictly speaking, to come under the species. He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his way upward in the world. He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man. His hands, large and coarse, were plentifully bedecked with rings; and he wore a heavy gold watch-chain, with a bundle of seals of portentous size, and a great variety of colors, attached to it,–which, in the ardor of conversation, he was in the habit of flourishing and jingling with evident satisfaction. His conversation was in free and easy defiance of Murray’s Grammar,* and was garnished at convenient intervals with various profane expressions, which not even the desire to be graphic in our account shall induce us to transcribe.

His companion, Mr. Shelby, had the appearance of a gentleman; and the arrangements of the house, and the general air of the housekeeping, indicated easy, and even opulent circumstances. As we before stated, the two were in the midst of an earnest conversation.


Our antiqued paper is delicately laced with a subtle hint of gold in the creases creating an almost magical look. (Although it’s difficult to catch with a camera, you can see in the image below how the shimmering is caught in the light)


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